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Biological Does bad luck cause cancer?
Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions. Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein
 
Scientists traditionally believed that cancer risk was due to a person's genetics and lifestyle risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol use, and exposure to radiation. However, this theory, called the somatic mutation theory, does not...

annotations posted 04/29/2016
original paper published 01/23/2015

Biological There's a new kid in town
Rapid evolution of a native species following invasion by a congener. Yoel Stuart et al. 
 
In recent years, biologists have increasingly recognized that evolutionary change can occur rapidly when natural selection is strong. In a field study conducted on small islands in Florida, Stuart et al. found that native lizards adapted to higher perches...

annotations posted 04/15/2016
original paper published 10/24/2014

Physical Say goodbye to stains
Robust self-cleaning surfaces that function when exposed to either air or oil. Yao Lu et al.
 
annotated by Patricia Weisensee
 
Did you ever wish that the water you just spilled had not wet your entire pants? Or that your clothes remained clean after that walk on the beach? Lu et al. found an easy yet effective...

annotations posted 04/01/2016
original paper published 03/06/2015

Biological Lighting up life
Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Gene Expression. Martin Chalfie, et al.
 
Scientists' ability to track the activity of proteins has long been limited by our ability to see the proteins we're tracking. Modern biomedical researchers have overcome this with a unique solution: make the proteins glow. In the 1960s, Martin Chalfie extracted...

annotations posted 03/18/2016
original paper published 02/11/1994

Biological Getting to know your neighbors: Parasitic plants traffic RNA with their hosts
Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its hosts. Gunjune Kim et al.
 
Communication is at the center of our existence. Every day we communicate with a number of people around us to live productive and meaningful lives. Meanwhile, within our own human bodies, millions of cells act in unison, never ceasing to listen or talk to each other...

annotations posted 03/04/2016
original paper published 08/15/2014

Physical Western U.S. on the rise
Ongoing drought-induced uplift in the western United States. Adrian Antal Borsa, Duncan Carr Agnew, Daniel R. Cayan.
 
Ground water is a large source of fresh water for most of the western United States. Being, of course, beneath the surface can make it quite a challenge to monitor, especially at the regional scale. However, methods to keep track of changes in this...

annotations posted 02/19/2016
original paper published 09/26/2014

Biological How heroin held the key to understanding Parkinson’s disease
Chronic Parkinsonism in Humans due to a Product of Meperidine-AnalogSynthesis.  Langston et al.
 
Langston and colleagues studied four patients who had taken a synthetic drug, with actions like heroin, intravenously, then rapidly developed parkinsonism. Within a week of taking the drug, the patients started experiencing symptoms such as hallucinations,...

annotations posted 02/05/2016
original paper published 02/25/1983

Biological Mimicking a bundle of waste: Influenza A virus strategic attack

Influenza A virus uses the aggresome processing machinery for host cell entry.  Banerjee et al. 

Fighting the influenza A virus (IAV) still remains a great challenge, and there is a real and urgent need for developing new antiviral medicines. Until now, scientists did not know how the virus was able to release its viral genetic material, which is well protected inside a shell, the...

annotations posted 01/22/2016
original paper published 10/24/2014

Biological What can invertebrates tell us about back pain?
Development of the annelid axochord: Insights into notochord evolution.  Lauri et al.   
    The spinal column is a major source of structural support in vertebrates. The cartilaginous discs between each vertebra develop from an embryonic structure called the notochord. But how did the notochord evolve? The experiments in...

    annotations posted 01/08/2016
    original paper published 09/12/2014

    Biological Sleep: no longer just for dreaming
    Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning.  Yang et al
     
    Scientists know that sleep is involved in learning and memory, however they don't know exactly how.  In this study, scientists examine how the structure of a neuron changes after a task...

    annotations posted 12/25/2015
    original paper published 10/26/2015

    Pages

    Biological Does bad luck cause cancer?
    Variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions. Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein
     
    Scientists traditionally believed that cancer risk was due to a person's genetics and lifestyle risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol use, and exposure to radiation. However, this theory, called the somatic mutation theory, does not...

    annotations posted 04/29/2016
    original paper published 01/23/2015

    Biological There's a new kid in town
    Rapid evolution of a native species following invasion by a congener. Yoel Stuart et al. 
     
    In recent years, biologists have increasingly recognized that evolutionary change can occur rapidly when natural selection is strong. In a field study conducted on small islands in Florida, Stuart et al. found that native lizards adapted to higher perches...

    annotations posted 04/15/2016
    original paper published 10/24/2014

    Physical Say goodbye to stains
    Robust self-cleaning surfaces that function when exposed to either air or oil. Yao Lu et al.
     
    annotated by Patricia Weisensee
     
    Did you ever wish that the water you just spilled had not wet your entire pants? Or that your clothes remained clean after that walk on the beach? Lu et al. found an easy yet effective...

    annotations posted 04/01/2016
    original paper published 03/06/2015

    Biological Lighting up life
    Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Gene Expression. Martin Chalfie, et al.
     
    Scientists' ability to track the activity of proteins has long been limited by our ability to see the proteins we're tracking. Modern biomedical researchers have overcome this with a unique solution: make the proteins glow. In the 1960s, Martin Chalfie extracted...

    annotations posted 03/18/2016
    original paper published 02/11/1994

    Biological Getting to know your neighbors: Parasitic plants traffic RNA with their hosts
    Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its hosts. Gunjune Kim et al.
     
    Communication is at the center of our existence. Every day we communicate with a number of people around us to live productive and meaningful lives. Meanwhile, within our own human bodies, millions of cells act in unison, never ceasing to listen or talk to each other...

    annotations posted 03/04/2016
    original paper published 08/15/2014

    Physical Western U.S. on the rise
    Ongoing drought-induced uplift in the western United States. Adrian Antal Borsa, Duncan Carr Agnew, Daniel R. Cayan.
     
    Ground water is a large source of fresh water for most of the western United States. Being, of course, beneath the surface can make it quite a challenge to monitor, especially at the regional scale. However, methods to keep track of changes in this...

    annotations posted 02/19/2016
    original paper published 09/26/2014

    Biological How heroin held the key to understanding Parkinson’s disease
    Chronic Parkinsonism in Humans due to a Product of Meperidine-AnalogSynthesis.  Langston et al.
     
    Langston and colleagues studied four patients who had taken a synthetic drug, with actions like heroin, intravenously, then rapidly developed parkinsonism. Within a week of taking the drug, the patients started experiencing symptoms such as hallucinations,...

    annotations posted 02/05/2016
    original paper published 02/25/1983

    Biological Mimicking a bundle of waste: Influenza A virus strategic attack

    Influenza A virus uses the aggresome processing machinery for host cell entry.  Banerjee et al. 

    Fighting the influenza A virus (IAV) still remains a great challenge, and there is a real and urgent need for developing new antiviral medicines. Until now, scientists did not know how the virus was able to release its viral genetic material, which is well protected inside a shell, the...

    annotations posted 01/22/2016
    original paper published 10/24/2014

    Biological What can invertebrates tell us about back pain?
    Development of the annelid axochord: Insights into notochord evolution.  Lauri et al.   
      The spinal column is a major source of structural support in vertebrates. The cartilaginous discs between each vertebra develop from an embryonic structure called the notochord. But how did the notochord evolve? The experiments in...

      annotations posted 01/08/2016
      original paper published 09/12/2014

      Biological Sleep: no longer just for dreaming
      Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning.  Yang et al
       
      Scientists know that sleep is involved in learning and memory, however they don't know exactly how.  In this study, scientists examine how the structure of a neuron changes after a task...

      annotations posted 12/25/2015
      original paper published 10/26/2015

      Pages